Does Your Organization Need a ‘Returnship’ Program?

What if your perfect “intern” was really a mid-career professional returning to work after taking some time off from their career? Similar to traditional internships, these “returnships” provide a paid position for 12 to 18 weeks to give returning employees a chance to find their feet again in the workplace. “Companies recognize that there is this large pool of talent sitting on the shelf and not being engaged in the workforce,” says Tami Forman, executive director of Path Forward, a nonprofit organization that creates mid-career internship programs to ease the transition back to work. “Hiring managers might worry about a gap in a resume, but these programs create an onramp for employers to bring people on board.” These programs are likely to grow as employers try to deal with shortages in specific fields such as software development, says Leigh Steere, co-founder of Managing People Better, a management research and consulting company. She …

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3 Perks that Impress Millennials the Most

Millennials now represent the largest segment of the workforce, and they have the potential to cause significant disruption in the next few years: According to the Deloitte Millennial Survey 2016, two-thirds of millennials said they want to leave their current employer by 2020. Want to know how to keep them around? These three perks are among those that impress millennials the most. 1. Flexibility Whether it’s in their schedule, the work they do, benefits packages or how they engage with work when they’re ostensibly “off,” flexibility matters to millennials. “Millennials have never been tethered by wires, creating an expectation of freedom-enabling technology that eliminates the traditional in-office 9-to-5,” says Amber Hyatt, director of product marketing for talent-management solutions provider SilkRoad. “They’re more concerned with the work they produce versus where they produce it, and organizations must embrace that view.” Employers can take advantage of this by looking for ways to …

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What Does the Future Hold for the Fiduciary Rule?

The U.S. Labor Department’s so-called fiduciary rule, proposed during the Obama administration, would change the status of some financial professionals under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). It was originally supposed to be implemented in phases earlier this year but ran into delays and reviews. Now, Rep. Ann Wagner, a Republican from Missouri, has introduced a bill that would make some changes to the latest ruling, including giving the Securities and Exchange Commission the lead on fiduciary regulation, in place of the DOL. “The fiduciary rule in its current form renders all investment professionals who work with retirement plans or advise retirement plans [as] fiduciaries under the ERISA definition,” says Raphael Katz, a partner at the law firm Sadowski Katz. This results in a strict standard against self-dealing, he says — but that could change. Here’s what you need to know. The Proposed Change Wagner and financial industry proponents …

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