Using Data to Set Goals Employees Want to Achieve

Using Data to Set Goals Employees Want to Achieve

What do your employees want to know or accomplish? Their answers to a simple interest survey can be the catalyst for effective wellness communication. Wellness communication is often an afterthought, viewed by organizations as a necessary byproduct of their wellness plans. Most companies try to figure out ways to elicit employee participation only after they design or adopt their wellness programs. Communication doesn’t lead the charge; it just goes along for the ride. Messages to employees—emails, brochures, company newsletter articles, etc.—are viewed as individual projects instead of a process. But the most effective wellness communication isn’t served late, whipped together in a hodgepodge of messages, voices and looks. It’s developed early in the process, integrated into other core decisions about the program’s features and benefits. The result of simple planning can be a communication structure that’s forward-thinking and energizing, a total communications experience that inspires, informs, shares and celebrates the …

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