Making Flex-Work Work for Everyone

Making Flex-Work Work for Everyone

Flex-work is a growing trend, with many companies worldwide offering employees a level of choice about when and where they work. Touted benefits include improved health and employee loyalty and lower office costs. However, successful flex-work programs don’t just happen. Making flex-work work requires strong, clear management and communication, a transition to output-based management and full team member engagement. Clear Management and Communication Employers must be able to articulate the why and the how of their flex-work policies. All flex-work arrangements should provide a clear benefit to the organization. Options, parameters and degrees of formality or duration should be communicated clearly, and a consistent process for requesting, implementing and assessing flex-work options should be developed to ensure clarity and fairness. Output-Based Management In a flex-work environment, management by presenteeism is neither relevant nor appropriate. By allowing employees to customize their work structure, you are necessarily refocusing on results. For a …

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5 Ways to Calm Stress at Work

5 Ways to Calm Stress at Work

When Aon Hewitt, a human resources and management consulting company, polled thousands of employees to find out the source of stress in their lives, the top four reasons all had one source – work. That doesn’t mean most people hate their jobs or are miserable at the office. The reality is anyone who works has probably experienced tension, anxiety and assorted worries related to their work environment from time to time. In fact, the American Psychological Association (APA) points out that even if you absolutely love what you do, your job can include stressful pressures such as having to meet deadlines. Problems develop, however, when stress at work is chronic. And, if you lack coping strategies, it can result in a variety of health woes. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), chronic stress can trigger digestive symptoms, headaches, sleeplessness, depression, anger and irritability. People who experience stress regularly …

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4 Topics Your Employee Handbook Should Cover – But May Not

4 Topics Your Employee Handbook Should Cover But May Not

An employee handbook is a great way to communicate a variety of information about your company to employees. Most employee handbooks contain nondiscrimination policies, terms of employment, alcohol and drug policies, and rules about using technology and social media. There are other topics your employee handbook should include, however. Here are 4 types of information your employee handbook should cover, but might not. 1.  Media Relations Chances are that your company will draw media attention at some point. Whether it’s for a snazzy new product or a serious scandal, you need to have the right people lined up to do the talking to reporters and bloggers. Include information in your employee handbook about whom the company has designated to speak to the media on its behalf – and make sure every employee knows to transfer calls from the media to the appropriate contacts. Avoid blanket prohibitions about speaking to the media …

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Why and How to Avoid Politics at Work

Why and How to Avoid Politics at Work

It can be tempting to discuss politics at work. After all, whether it’s a looming national election or a local one, you have a perfect right to strongly endorse a candidate and to discuss who won a debate. But don’t do it at work! That’s the advice of business etiquette expert and communications consultant Barbara Pachter, whose client list includes Microsoft, Pfizer, Chrysler, Cisco and ConEdison. “The problem is that people often have strong opinions when it comes to politics. And in today’s super-charged political climate, it’s easy to say something that might insult or enrage your boss, a customer or a co-worker,” she explains. “Political discussions can quickly and easily escalate into arguments, sometimes heated ones.” Pachter, who’s the author of numerous books, including The Power of Positive Confrontation, says the following questions are “hot buttons” you should avoid: “Who are you going to vote for?” Never ask this …

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