Breast Health: What you need to know

Do you know the guidelines for getting screened for breast cancer? The American Cancer Society recommendations: Ages 40 to 44: Begin mammograms if you wish; discuss screening with your provider by age 40. Ages 45 to 54: Get annual mammograms if you have average risk of breast cancer. Ages 55 and older: Get mammograms once every 2 years or seek annual exams, depending on your risk. Note: Women with a relative (parent, sibling or child) who had breast cancer may consider starting screening from ages 40 to 49. Be sure to review your medical history and any other breast cancer risk factors with your healthcare provider. If you’re in a high-risk group based on gene mutations, a strong family history or other factors, ask your provider if more screening tests might be useful. Factors that may RAISE RISK for breast cancer: • Age — the older a woman, or man, …

CONTINUE READING

How to Read Your Health Insurance Explanation of Benefits Statement

People generally know less than they think they do when it comes to understanding their health benefits — which can lead to problems down the road. According to the American Institutes for Research, 3 out of 4 people said they felt confident that they knew how to use their health insurance. But only 1 out of 5 could accurately calculate their out-of-pocket costs. This lack of knowledge can hurt when the explanation of benefits (EOB) shows up in the mail. The EOB is a form that identifies the treatment or services you were provided and what amount your insurance will pay, says Erin Singleton, chief of mission delivery at the Patient Advocate Foundation, a nonprofit that provides professional case management services to people with chronic, life-threatening and debilitating illnesses. The EOB often says “This is not a bill” in large letters, and then has a chart or balance sheet detailing …

CONTINUE READING