Create a Bike-to-Work Program That Works

Biking to work is the fastest-growing mode of commuting, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The bureau found that the number of people who bike to work increased about 60% from 2000 to the 2008-2012 period. Mark Martin of Baton Rouge is 1 of those commuters. “I haven’t owned a motor vehicle for 25 years,” Martin says. He says he started biking regularly about 14 years ago; then he started a bicycle advocacy organization, now known as Bike Baton Rouge. “I commute daily to work, and to pretty much everything else I do,” Martin says. “The shortest is a little over 3 miles, the longest a little over 11 miles.” Biking to work can bring a lot of benefits to employers and employees alike. If you want to create an effective bike-to-work program, start with these tips. Tout the Benefits Educate employees about the advantages of biking to work. “First of all, …

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This Workplace Epidemic Is Costing Billions

In today’s world, many workers are worn down and some completely wiped out due to inadequate rest and sleep. Make sure your workplace wellness program addresses this issue or you may find that employees aren’t the only ones drained. It’s estimated that lack of sleep costs U.S. companies $63 billion in lost productivity each year. If Your Team Is Too Tired, It Could Mean Trouble For Everyone Nearly seven in 10 U.S. workers said they work while tired, with nearly one-third (31%) saying they do so very often, according to this 2016 survey. Survey respondents indicated their drowsiness led to: Being easily distracted (52%) Procrastinating more (47%) Being grumpy (38%) Making more mistakes (29%) Some of the admitted big-ticket blunders included: Making a $20,000 mistake on a purchase order. Deleting a project that took 1,000 hours to complete. Missing a decimal point on an estimated payment and the client overpaying by …

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Focusing on Employees’ Personal Financial Well-Being Pays Off

Personal finances can have a huge impact on your employees’ overall well-being. When you care about your employees and your organization, it’s a no-brainer — you make sure you’re including financial well-being in all workplace well-being efforts. According to PwC’s 2017 Employee Financial Wellness Survey, financial stress is costing companies. 53% of all employees are stressed about their finances. Nearly 1/3 of all employees are distracted by personal financial issues while at work. Almost 1/2 of them spend 3 hours or more each week handling personal finances at work. Those who are stressed about finances miss work on account of their personal financial issues and often cite health issues caused by financial stress. “These findings are concerning and potentially significant for companies looking to evaluate the return on investment of a financial wellness program,” wrote Kent E. Allison, a PwC Partner and National Practice Leader. But, let’s be honest, there is more at …

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The 6 Most Common Benefits Mistakes Long-Term Employees Make

If you’ve been with a company for a long time, it’s easy to get comfortable with your position there. This goes for your employee benefits, as well: You might fall into a routine and not realize the many options your employer offers that fit you better than your current coverage. Don’t miss out by making these benefits mistakes. 1. Ignoring Communications HR sends out all sorts of announcements about employee benefits — are you listening? If you’re not paying attention to employee communications, you could miss enrollment deadlines or valuable new benefits that you didn’t know you had. Chris Lokken, an employee benefits consultant with Johnson Insurance, says he often asks employees how many took advantage of the regular free eye exam their health insurance often covers. “Usually I get 3 or 4 hands to go up, and 5 or 10 people see me after the meeting and ask me …

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How to Use Personality Testing to Improve Employee Engagement

Are you an introvert, a yellow or a D? Those are some of the terms that describe people’s personalities as measured by common assessments. Employers can use personality tests to gain insight into how employees prefer to process information, make decisions and interact with one another. The most common personality tests used in HR settings include: Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Keirsey Temperament Sorter DiSC These assessments break personalities down in different ways: some, such as DISC, have as few as four outcomes, while the Myers-Briggs assessment yields 16 categorizations. Whatever the result, these designations can help provide employees and company leaders with valuable insights about the organization. Assessing personalities and sharing the results with employees can be transformational, says Joan Tremblay, an organizational leadership trainer and coach. “In one organization, there had been a 20-plus-year feud between two managers with very different personality styles that affected the morale of each division,” …

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