Biosimilars: Preparing For The Revolution

Biosimilars: Preparing For The Revolution

In the pharmaceutical industry, necessity is the mother of invention. Faced with the impending loss of exclusivity of several biologics currently on the market, biosimilars have emerged as a cost-saving alternative. But the road to market has been a bumpy one. Innovation goes hand-in-hand with significant R&D costs and competition. The complexity and cost of production, regulatory drag, and push-back from companies with biologics on the market through legal challenges and aggressive marketing of the original biologics have all been contributing factors slowing their arrival. But make no mistake, biosimilars are coming. A Trend Not to be Ignored Significant growth in the biosimilars market is expected with the global market size expected to reach $2 billion by 2018. New legislation on biosimilars is being adopted around the world, and while there are currently only 2 agents approved in the US, more than 20 are approved in Europe. Development is accelerating, …

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Ever Wondered Just Who Insures the Olympics?

Just who insures the Olympics?

With the Rio Olympics in full swing, we wanted to know just who insures the Olympics? Well, that’s a pretty complicated question. With 308 events showcasing the talents of 11,551 athletes, over $9 Billion in infrastructure and transportation investments, and over 300 gold medals ranging in value from $10,000 to over $1 Million, there are a multitude of Health, Disability, and Property & Casualty risk and coverage concerns that are inherent to the Olympics. When Medals are Meddled With One area of concern is the coverage of potential loss of an Olympic medal, especially gold medals.  These can range in value depending upon factors such as which sport they are awarded in or if they have some specific historical significance. For example, one of the four gold medals won by Jesse Owens in the 1936 Berlin Olympics was sold in 2013 for $1.47 Million. While this medal probably has its …

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Flexibility Bias: What HR Leaders Need to Know

Flexibility Bias: What HR Leaders Need to Know

What happens when employees need a flexible work schedule, often in response to childcare needs? While it’s not uncommon for workers to arrange a telecommuting or flex time schedule with their employers, there can be a significant downside – flexibility bias. This phenomenon, involving prejudice and resentment from co-workers and even managers towards employees who need a flexible schedule, isn’t new. However, its impact may be more pervasive and damaging than many employees and employers realize. A case in point: Researchers at Rice University and the University of California, San Diego, polled 266 faculty members at a top-ranked university about attitudes towards parents of young children who had flexible work schedules. The results, recently published in the journal Work and Occupations, show flexibility bias is a problem even in a university setting where flexible schedules are more common – and this prejudice can not only harm a worker’s career, but it can also negatively impact an organization’s bottom line. While the study …

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Why Too Much Sodium Can Impact Productivity

Why Too Much Sodium Can Impact Productivity

Avoiding tobacco products, exercise and eating a healthy diet are all well-known strategies that can improve health and, in turn, disability and health care costs. A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report released earlier this year concludes it’s time to encourage people to consume less salt (sodium chloride). Almost 90% of Americans eat too much sodium daily, even if they never pick up a saltshaker. That’s because most excess sodium is hidden in fast and processed foods. However it gets into food, too much of it is putting the health of millions at risk, according to the CDC. About 70 million American adults have high blood pressure and only half have it under control. That raises their risk for heart disease, stroke and other ills that take the lives of more than 800,000 Americans each year. The economic toll, as well as the personal suffering, is enormous. Cardiovascular disease …

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What Your Company Needs To Know About Offering Paternity Leave

What Your Company Needs To Know About Offering Paternity Leave

In 2014, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released guidelines on pregnancy discrimination and related issues, including paternity leave. The regulations specify that the same bonding time must be given to new fathers as is given to new mothers. Specifically, the EEOC regulation states: For purposes of determining Title VII’s requirements, employers should carefully distinguish between leave related to any physical limitations imposed by pregnancy or childbirth (described in this document as pregnancy-related medical leave) and leave for purposes of bonding with a child and/or providing care for a child (described in this document as parental leave). Leave related to pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions can be limited to women affected by those conditions. However, parental leave must be provided to similarly situated men and women on the same terms. If, for example, an employer extends leave to new mothers beyond the period of recuperation from childbirth (e.g. to provide the mothers time to bond with and/or care …

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