Why HR Needs to Care About Employee Engagement

Employee engagement has joined the pantheon of human resources buzzwords of late. Attend any conference and it will be thrown around to and fro, guaranteed. But what’s the big deal? If employees show up and get their work done, does it really matter how “engaged” they are? Yes, it matters. Engagement is everything. Here’s why. Creating a Virtuous Cycle Engaged employees, those who have good relationships with their supervisors and feel valued and heard by their employers, have lower rates of turnover than disengaged employees, says Meredith Falb, marketing manager for CorporateRewards.com, an engagement tool combining software and consultation. Not only do they stay with employers longer, but engaged employees are also more productive, “which manifests itself in superior financial performance and reputation. As the company becomes more profitable and better known, it creates a virtuous cycle: attractive company = better recruits = better results,” says Falb. As their engagement …

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How to Promote a Culture of Healthy Feedback

Feedback is a must to ensure projects stay on topic and teams work well together. An organization that isn’t good at giving feedback to employees often will have people or departments working at cross purposes. A culture of feedback enables organizations to work together more effectively. For most companies, the change doesn’t happen overnight, says Chris Collins, director of Cornell University’s Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies and associate professor of the ILR School’s HR studies department. “People underestimate how long it takes managers to become good at giving feedback, and how long it takes people to understand that it’s now part of the culture. It can be years, not weeks or months. But once you’ve got leaders giving feedback regularly and effectively, and as people who have gotten feedback become managers and leaders, it becomes a part of the culture.” This white paper will offer some steps organizations should …

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Using Data to Set Goals Employees Want to Achieve

Using Data to Set Goals Employees Want to Achieve

What do your employees want to know or accomplish? Their answers to a simple interest survey can be the catalyst for effective wellness communication. Wellness communication is often an afterthought, viewed by organizations as a necessary byproduct of their wellness plans. Most companies try to figure out ways to elicit employee participation only after they design or adopt their wellness programs. Communication doesn’t lead the charge; it just goes along for the ride. Messages to employees—emails, brochures, company newsletter articles, etc.—are viewed as individual projects instead of a process. But the most effective wellness communication isn’t served late, whipped together in a hodgepodge of messages, voices and looks. It’s developed early in the process, integrated into other core decisions about the program’s features and benefits. The result of simple planning can be a communication structure that’s forward-thinking and energizing, a total communications experience that inspires, informs, shares and celebrates the …

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The Progress Principle

The Progress Principle

When Teresa Amabile, professor of Business Administration and a Director of Research at Harvard Business School, and developmental psychologist Steven Kramer conducted research to learn what makes people not only come to work but also drives them to stay and perform at their best, they found the answer surprising. Employees weren’t engaged and happy with their jobs because of high salaries or on-site perks like state-of-the-art athletic facilities or even free food. Instead, they found that motivated and downright joyful workers had satisfying inner work lives. What does this mean specifically? In their book The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work (Harvard Business Review Press), Amabile and Kramer explain that great inner work life is about the work, not the accouterments. “It starts with giving people something meaningful to accomplish… It requires giving clear goals, autonomy, help and resources – what people need to …

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Are Your Employees Clueless About Company Business Goals?

Are Your Employees Clueless About Company Business Goals?

When employees aren’t clear about the strategic business goals of the organization they work for — or when they don’t even know what those goals are — a company’s path to business success can be seriously hampered. Unfortunately, according to a recent survey, too many employees are, in fact, downright clueless about their firm’s objectives. The new survey was developed by Robert Half Management Resources (an international provider of senior-level finance, accounting and business systems professionals on a project and interim basis) and involved interviews and data collection conducted by an independent research firm. More than 2,100 chief financial officers (CFOs), representing a stratified random sample of companies in more than 20 of the largest metropolitan areas in the U.S., were asked this pivotal question: “In your opinion, how aware are your employees of the company’s strategic business goals?” Survey Results Over 1/3 of these executives (34%) stated their workers …

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