A Short Lesson on Whole Life & Term Life Insurance

When faced with the wide range of life insurance coverage available, you may wonder what type fits your needs now and what coverage you should consider for future needs. A good first step is to look at two basic types of insurance coverage: whole life and term life. Whole Life Insurance—Cash Value for Your Dollar Whole life insurance helps to provide not only security from financial hardship in the case of a death, but also a cash value component of the policy. Under a cash value life insurance policy, premium payments cover the cost of pure insurance coverage first, including the expenses and mortality factors of the insurance company; the insurance company then accumulates “leftover” dollars to build the cash value of the policy. In addition to cash value buildup in the policy, some insurance companies may provide whole life insurance policyholders with dividend payments—due to lower expenses, lower mortality …

CONTINUE READING

A Look at Medicaid

For an increasing number of families, long-term care planning is becoming a topic discussed with an unfortunate frequency. When a once healthy and vibrant person needs full-time care—either suddenly or through the ravages of a progressive illness—staggering pressures can bear down on that person, their immediate family, and close friends. One of the first and most natural questions that comes to mind is the question of cost: Where will the money come from to allow the individual to live out the rest of his or her life in the most comfortable situation possible? For a fortunate few, long-term care insurance will provide the necessary funds. For others, the savings of a lifetime can be depleted in a relatively short period of time without proper planning. At some point, the discussion of funding care will no doubt turn to Medicaid, a difficult topic to deliberate when combined with the stress of …

CONTINUE READING

Common Employee Misconceptions About Benefits

The only way your employees will get the most out of their benefits, and for you to ensure your organization is getting a good return on its investment, is if they fully understand them. But in the Open Enrollment Survey done by Aflac in 2012, only 16 percent of employees reported feeling confident they hadn’t made any mistakes during open enrollment, and almost a quarter felt they hadn’t picked the right coverage for their needs. Employees can get the wrong ideas about their benefits, and miscommunication, apathy or ignorance can perpetuate those misconceptions. The cost of ignorance is high: Employees may not have the coverage they need, and you may be paying for coverage they’re not using. This guide will help you understand four common misconceptions employees have about benefits offerings and what human resources leaders can do to educate them. How Much They Cost Experts say one of the …

CONTINUE READING

Which Employee Benefits Do Workers Value Most?

An improving economy has made the talent market heat up, and organizations are finding they need to look for new ways to recruit and retain high-performing employees. One of the tools many organizations use to attract high-talent candidates and hold onto their top performers is a strong benefits package. While different employees have different preferences and needs, there are some trends worth noting when it comes to the benefits employees value. This white paper will look at benefits employees tend to value most, and examine how organizations can use benefits to improve their recruiting and retention efforts. Health Insurance One of the most valued employee benefits is health insurance. “Employees value health insurance, dental and vision the most,” says Nicole Wright of Entrepreneurs Loft. Research backs that up. According to a Towers Watson survey, 46 percent of respondents said health care benefits are an important reason for deciding to work …

CONTINUE READING

How to Understand Your Health Insurance Coverage

Understanding ins and outs of your health insurance plan may be difficult, but it’s an important step in protecting your physical, mental and financial health. To help you out, we’ve assembled some health insurance basics that apply to almost any plan. To begin with, there are so many insurance-specific terms that it’s easy to get tripped up and confuse them. Here are four you need to understand: Deductible: This is the amount you must pay out-of-pocket before the insurance company will contribute to any of your health-related expenses. Coinsurance: This is the amount, usually a percentage, that you pay for any health care costs after you’ve met your deductible. For example, if your deductible is $1,000 and you require a service that costs $2,000 and have 25 percent coinsurance, then you pay $1,000 to meet the deductible and 25 percent of the rest ($250), for a total of $1,250. Copay …

CONTINUE READING