Which Employee Benefits Do Workers Value Most?

An improving economy has made the talent market heat up, and organizations are finding they need to look for new ways to recruit and retain high-performing employees. One of the tools many organizations use to attract high-talent candidates and hold onto their top performers is a strong benefits package. While different employees have different preferences and needs, there are some trends worth noting when it comes to the benefits employees value. This white paper will look at benefits employees tend to value most, and examine how organizations can use benefits to improve their recruiting and retention efforts. Health Insurance One of the most valued employee benefits is health insurance. “Employees value health insurance, dental and vision the most,” says Nicole Wright of Entrepreneurs Loft. Research backs that up. According to a Towers Watson survey, 46 percent of respondents said health care benefits are an important reason for deciding to work …

CONTINUE READING

Why HR Needs to Care About Employee Engagement

Employee engagement has joined the pantheon of human resources buzzwords of late. Attend any conference and it will be thrown around to and fro, guaranteed. But what’s the big deal? If employees show up and get their work done, does it really matter how “engaged” they are? Yes, it matters. Engagement is everything. Here’s why. Creating a Virtuous Cycle Engaged employees, those who have good relationships with their supervisors and feel valued and heard by their employers, have lower rates of turnover than disengaged employees, says Meredith Falb, marketing manager for CorporateRewards.com, an engagement tool combining software and consultation. Not only do they stay with employers longer, but engaged employees are also more productive, “which manifests itself in superior financial performance and reputation. As the company becomes more profitable and better known, it creates a virtuous cycle: attractive company = better recruits = better results,” says Falb. As their engagement …

CONTINUE READING

Mandatory Retirement: What You Need to Know

Retirement means different things to different people. For some it might mean a complete release from any work responsibilities or requirements and the start of a life of leisure. For others it may be more of a side-step into work they’ve always wanted to do, or the chance to start a business. But retirement comes when the worker wants to stop working, with exceptions made for pilots, air traffic controllers and, in some states, judges. Other employees aren’t told when to stop. “All U.S. employers with at least 20 employees are prohibited from taking adverse employment action based on age against most employees 40 years older or older,” says labor and employment lawyer Scott Horton. “In many states, age discrimination laws cover even more employers and employees. These laws essentially make it illegal to have a mandatory retirement age, even if someone could make a good business case.” Here’s what …

CONTINUE READING

How to Understand Your Health Insurance Coverage

Understanding ins and outs of your health insurance plan may be difficult, but it’s an important step in protecting your physical, mental and financial health. To help you out, we’ve assembled some health insurance basics that apply to almost any plan. To begin with, there are so many insurance-specific terms that it’s easy to get tripped up and confuse them. Here are four you need to understand: Deductible: This is the amount you must pay out-of-pocket before the insurance company will contribute to any of your health-related expenses. Coinsurance: This is the amount, usually a percentage, that you pay for any health care costs after you’ve met your deductible. For example, if your deductible is $1,000 and you require a service that costs $2,000 and have 25 percent coinsurance, then you pay $1,000 to meet the deductible and 25 percent of the rest ($250), for a total of $1,250. Copay …

CONTINUE READING

How Big Data Is Changing HR

One of the most revolutionary trends technology has brought to the field of human resources is the development of powerful software that can crunch enormous amounts of data. Through the use of “Big Data,” HR departments can analyze the vast stores of information they possess and identify patterns in employee recruitment, performance and retention that can provide valuable insights into what’s happened in the past — and even make predictions about what’s likely to happen in the future. By basing their predictions on hard data instead of instinct or casual observation, HR professionals can discover insights they may never have found through conventional means, and make confident decisions backed by solid evidence. Using Big Data is “seeing beyond the obvious,” says Luciano Pesci, CEO of Emperitas, a Utah tech company that builds customized business information tools and predictive analytics, and performs market research. “Big Data presents far more than a …

CONTINUE READING