Things All Financial Advisors Should Keep In Mind

Money management can seem pretty straightforward — customers set goals, and financial advisors help them meet those goals. But things aren’t always so simple. Emotions, family situations and the client’s financial standing can pose challenges for financial advisors if they’re not prepared. “Every individual is unique, and makes decisions about investing and wealth management influenced by their emotional makeup,” says wealth management adviser Chris White. “Financial advisors need to understand the emotional factors that drive their clients’ behavior, and their attitudes about risk-taking and money management. If they do, they will be better able to fashion wealth management plans that are suited to an individual client’s personality, temperament and risk-tolerance.” Here are some things to keep in mind. Plan for a Solo Life, as Well as Marriage Married couples who start financial planning generally don’t give any consideration to the chance of divorce, even as a remote contingency, says registered …

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How Big Broker-Dealers Are Buying Small Broker-Dealers, and What That Means for the Advisor

The past few years have been a whirl for advisors at smaller broker-dealers. Consolidation in the industry is rampant — last year’s 138 mergers and acquisitions were a record, according to Echelon Partners, and were a 10 percent increase compared with 2015, which had also been a record year. “For owners of smaller broker-dealers, it provides a great opportunity to sell a business and earn an exit payout,” says Evan Tarver, investments editor at FitSmallBusiness.com, a New York City-based business service that provides advice to small businesses. “For the advisers employed by these broker-dealers, it might be negative as they may be losing their jobs.” Here’s the latest on M&As among broker-dealers. What’s Inspiring These Acquisitions? In many cases, the U.S. Labor Department’s proposed fiduciary rule and the corresponding increased cost of doing business has been inspiring smaller and independent broker-dealers to look for other options, experts say. While parts …

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What Does the Future Hold for the Fiduciary Rule?

The U.S. Labor Department’s so-called fiduciary rule, proposed during the Obama administration, would change the status of some financial professionals under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). It was originally supposed to be implemented in phases earlier this year but ran into delays and reviews. Now, Rep. Ann Wagner, a Republican from Missouri, has introduced a bill that would make some changes to the latest ruling, including giving the Securities and Exchange Commission the lead on fiduciary regulation, in place of the DOL. “The fiduciary rule in its current form renders all investment professionals who work with retirement plans or advise retirement plans [as] fiduciaries under the ERISA definition,” says Raphael Katz, a partner at the law firm Sadowski Katz. This results in a strict standard against self-dealing, he says — but that could change. Here’s what you need to know. The Proposed Change Wagner and financial industry proponents …

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What the DOL’s Fiduciary Rule Means for Financial Professionals Now

What the DOL’s Fiduciary Rule Means for Financial Professionals Now

The U.S. Labor Department’s so-called fiduciary rule has a long history, and it appears it’s not over. Proposed under the Obama administration, the rule would change the status of some financial professionals under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). It was originally supposed to be phased in in April but has been delayed until June, with a transition period for some exemptions extending through Jan. 1, 2018. In addition, the Trump administration may want to make more changes. For financial professionals, it’s vital to stay up-to-date on the changes. “Good faith is not enough,” says Ronald Surz, president of PPCA. Here’s what financial advisers, especially those who work on commission, need to know. It Establishes Broader Fiduciary Responsibility Under the rule, all financial professionals who work with retirement plans, ESOPs, IRAs and so on, or who provide advice about retirement plans, will have to act in a fiduciary capacity. …

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