Basic Facts of Life Insurance

Thinking of a future without ourselves in it, is not the most pleasant of thoughts. . .however, it is necessary to do so for the financial security of your family. Life insurance may provide you with the opportunity to bequeath money to your survivors, while at the same time, provide the necessary liquidity to help pay estate taxes. This, in turn, may allow your assets to pass undiminished to your heirs. As a general rule of thumb when purchasing life insurance, it is usually thought that you would need eight to ten times your salary in order to take care of your family’s needs. A more accurate formula may be as follows: Determine the amount needed to help meet specific needs such as providing funds for college, paying off your mortgage, or giving money to an heir. Label this figure as [A]. Determine the amount necessary for the support of …

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Banks Look to Life Insurance for Future Growth

The Life Insurance Marketing and Research Association (LIMRA) says almost a third of U.S. households don’t carry life insurance, and many more don’t carry enough coverage. Part of the reason may be outreach: Even people who know they need more life insurance say they haven’t bought it because they haven’t been approached by a financial professional. More than half of responding households said in 2016 that they would be more likely to buy if advised by trusted financial professionals, which represents an opportunity for banks and credit unions. Profit margins on bank sales of life insurance tend to be strong, and consumers tend to trust their bankers. “It’s an easy sell when you are at the bank, in front of an adviser, and already in the mindset of your financial future,” says JC  Matthews, co-founder of Simply Insurance (simplyinsurance.co), an online insurance service. Here’s what you need to know. More …

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A Short Lesson on Whole Life & Term Life Insurance

When faced with the wide range of life insurance coverage available, you may wonder what type fits your needs now and what coverage you should consider for future needs. A good first step is to look at two basic types of insurance coverage: whole life and term life. Whole Life Insurance—Cash Value for Your Dollar Whole life insurance helps to provide not only security from financial hardship in the case of a death, but also a cash value component of the policy. Under a cash value life insurance policy, premium payments cover the cost of pure insurance coverage first, including the expenses and mortality factors of the insurance company; the insurance company then accumulates “leftover” dollars to build the cash value of the policy. In addition to cash value buildup in the policy, some insurance companies may provide whole life insurance policyholders with dividend payments—due to lower expenses, lower mortality …

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Nonqualified Plans – Baiting the Benefit Hook

Attracting and retaining qualified employees and managers is always a challenge for companies of all sizes. Most employers realize competitive salaries are not the only things desired by the best workers. Sought-after employees also expect compensation packages to include valued benefits. A qualified retirement plan is a traditional component of many employee benefit packages. As a business owner, you’re likely to appreciate the advantages: Your contributions are tax-deductible and accumulate on a tax-deferred basis. However, these plans can be difficult to administer and contain many regulations restricting employee eligibility, participation, vesting, and employee contributions. What’s the alternative? Nonqualified plans offer the flexibility to selectively choose whom you’ll cover and how much you’ll contribute for each individual. Many companies use them to supplement or replace their qualified plans. Although there is a wide range of nonqualified plans from which to choose, executive bonus plans and deferred compensation plans are among the …

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Common Employee Misconceptions About Benefits

The only way your employees will get the most out of their benefits, and for you to ensure your organization is getting a good return on its investment, is if they fully understand them. But in the Open Enrollment Survey done by Aflac in 2012, only 16 percent of employees reported feeling confident they hadn’t made any mistakes during open enrollment, and almost a quarter felt they hadn’t picked the right coverage for their needs. Employees can get the wrong ideas about their benefits, and miscommunication, apathy or ignorance can perpetuate those misconceptions. The cost of ignorance is high: Employees may not have the coverage they need, and you may be paying for coverage they’re not using. This guide will help you understand four common misconceptions employees have about benefits offerings and what human resources leaders can do to educate them. How Much They Cost Experts say one of the …

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