Does Your Company Offer Competitive Paid Leave?

Most U.S. employers aren’t required to offer their employees paid leave, but many do and this year they’re offering more. According to a recent Employee Benefits research report by the Society for Human Resource Management, more U.S. employers are offering paid leave benefits. For example, compared to previous years, more employers are offering: Paid sick leave plans Paid parental leave Paid vacation time Paid personal days As these numbers change, it’s important to review your own leave policies to ensure your offerings are competitive. Offering less paid leave than other companies in your industry or geographic area will make it harder for you to attract and maintain top talent. Top Paid Benefits According to the SHRM survey, the top paid leave benefit is paid holidays, which are offered by 98 percent of respondents. Other popular paid leave benefits include: Paid bereavement leave, offered by 86 percent of respondents. Paid jury duty …

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How Benefits Have Changed in 20 Years

How Benefits Have Changed in 20 Years

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) first began annual surveys of HR professionals back in l996 to find out what benefits organizations offer employees. To see how employee perks have evolved over time, the latest SHRM Employee Benefits Report, which queried almost 3,500 HR pros about 300 benefits, compared the 2016 findings with 1996 data and also to information collected in the past 5 years. “The number of benefits employers are offering is consistent with recent years,” said Evren Esen, director of survey programs at SHRM. “However, employers are always looking for new and innovative benefits that are cost-effective and best fit their workforce.” Employers have increased and decreased benefits strategically due to economic and technological changes, as well as to the shifting concerns of workers. For example, the SHRM report notes organizations are offering more telecommuting and flexible schedule options in response to employees, especially Millennials, who want …

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Biggest Challenges Facing HR Leaders in Next Decade

What are the biggest challenges HR leaders will face by the year 2022? To find out, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted a survey, titled Challenges Facing HR Over the Next 10 Years. The poll involved HR professionals selected at random from the SHRM’s 250,000 membership database. Overall, the 487 responses received in 2012 show HR leaders are concerned about many of the same issues that were deemed crucial by approximately 450 HR pros who participated in a similar poll conducted in 2010. However, there are a few key changes. Compared to the previous SHRM survey, HR executives are less concerned than they were in 2010 with finding employees in global markets and breaking down cultural barriers to create a truly global company. Instead, those answering the latest survey are now more focused on developing future leaders and remaining competitive in the talent marketplace. Top Survey Findings In …

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New Research: Employers Shifting Benefits

New Research: Employers Shifting Benefits

Despite the fact organizations are facing rising health care costs, many employers are directing more of their financial resources toward wellness and health benefits, according to new research conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). However, this shift comes at a price. Evren Esen, director of SHRM’s Survey Programs, pointed out in a media statement that as health benefits increase, other perks are being cut. For example, the 2014 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey shows a trend toward decreasing employer provided financial and compensation benefits such as tuition assistance, dependent care flexible spending accounts, and executive incentive bonus plans. Health Benefits Remain Key The 2014 SHRM Employee Benefits Survey, sponsored by Colonial Life & Accident Insurance Company, queried 510 randomly selected HR professionals about 300 benefits and found that health benefits remain of prime importance – 98% polled offer some type of health care coverage to their full-time employees. According …

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Companies Face Intergenerational Conflicts with Personnel

HR Faces Intergenerational Conflicts with Personnel

Over the past 10 years, organizations have seen a sharp increase in the number of older Americans in the workplace as aging baby boomers continue to work instead of retiring – out of choice or due to economic reasons. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of people aged 65 and older in the labor force (i.e., working or looking for work) soared from 4.2 million in 2000 to 6.7 million in 2010. As young people start careers and workers in mid-life and those in their 60s and beyond work together in greater numbers than ever, companies are faced with the challenge of contention in the workplace between these different generations who often approach their careers and how to do their jobs effectively very differently. Generational Conflicts on the Job The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) surveyed 400 randomly selected SHRM members in 2011 and found that conflicts …

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